Garden Ornaments and its finally time to get out in the Garden!

Art in the Garden is certainly not a new idea.  It provides a practical purpose as a place for the eye to rest or be drawn to. It can be artsy, a container, a sculpture, a spiritual figure, an arbor, water feature or any type of vessel.  It provides structural definition and architecture to the garden.  It creates geometry.

Birdbaths-71
Hummingbird birdbath

july14-023

20120807-black-eyed-susans-002

This can also be accomplished with clipped shapes or allee’s which emphasize the geometry of your garden.  In these instances maybe boxwoods or trees create the geometry and symmetry.

Robert Courturier-7

bunny-williams-michael-trapp-8

bunny-williams-michael-trapp-9
Clipped boxwoods, Vessel, Tulips

Merge your art into your planting beds.  Your plants should be the frosting on the cake!

July 23 032
Water fountain among the Daisies and bee balm
13_Garden Images_130002800028
Fun garden art in among the peonies
Nepeta Linda Allard
Nepeta with Statuary among the flowers
Naumkeag blog-13
Water fountain

I spent today pruning shrubs, cleaning up leaves, removing the thick layer of mulch I put down around my roses and tender perennials.  Finally I think we may have turned the corner and I took off the burlap coats that I bundled some of my newly transplanted roses and hydrangeas in last fall. I think the Boxwood that I have now transplanted 3 times made it thru as did my new Oakleaf Hydrangeas.

Use garden supports to create winter interest and structure.

20150516-dsc05889

 

20150516-dsc05911
Be whimsical

20150516-dsc05887

20150516-dsc05891

Always when planning your garden start with the structure of the property!  In reality 20% – 50% of your garden should be evergreen and shrubs.  Remember we talked a few weeks ago about planting for winter interest.  We need to think of our gardens as a year round canvas.  A low maintenance garden might include 40% evergreens, 35% deciduous shrubs and 25% perennials, ground covers and bulbs. Try planting in masses of 9 -50 for broad sweeps of color, texture and pattern.

The goal is to create layers of interest throughout the year. Vertical elements will frame the garden views. Pay attention to the view from your windows.  Where do you most often see your garden from inside.  Create focal points around these axis points when creating major elements of your landscape, patios and walls.

july-23-013
Out the kitchen window

rufulo-wordpress

Pay attention to the traffic flow throughout the garden. Of course, you must remember sun and shade and check your Zone when selecting plants. Create different rooms in your garden so there is always something just around the corner and consider a separation of public and private space.  There should be a reason to continue to meander through. Collect pictures that speak to you style, feelings and the light in your space.  Dream as big as possible then evaluate your site. If you have an amazing view try to frame it, almost like a photograph!

If you are starting from scratch, I recommend a qualified garden designer.  Like any renovation the job is always bigger than we anticipate and a knowledgeable professional can guide you thru the pitfalls.  Remember that plants take time to mature. I usually tell people it takes 3 years for perennials to start to reach their full potential.  If a plant is really struggling maybe try it in a different spot.  Is it getting the correct amount of light and water.

Hydrangea Pink Diamond
Hydrangea ‘Pink Diamond’ on left with Loosestrife

 

Remember that every property has its assets and limitations created by sun and shade, soil and water.  There are always plants that will thrive in each condition.  Match the plants to the site and include ornamentals.  Instead of all your containers being on the porch move them out into the flower garden where you can add some height and dimension.  Plants requiring special needs can find a home here.  Don’t forget to mix vegetables into your flower beds.  No one says vegetables all need to be in a separate bed!  I mix my herbs, especially  sage, oregano, rosemary and chives into my beds. Last year I experimented with Kale and loved it!  The dark green leaves were an awesome contrast to the surrounding plants and help hide some struggling shrubs that I transplanted, yet again!

Maywood-2
Artichokes

Pay attention to the labels.  We are all guilty of going to the garden center and falling in love with this and that only to realize we have brought home something that will not work in our landscape.  Full sun means sun for the greater part of the day, typically 6 hours or more.  Daylilies for example.  Shade can be a little challenging.  We see full shade, part shade, dappled shade, light shade, so confusing right!  Full shade really means full shade for the entire day.  Plants that need full shade often get scorched when sunlight fades them out. When considering part shade morning sun is always preferable as it is not as strong.  Avoid afternoon sun when possible. Light shade means 2-3 hours of shade during the hottest part of the day. There are literally many, many plants for any given situation. Just like with painting, preparation is key.  If you take the time to properly prepare your garden beds you will find success.

2016-04-10-overall-plan

Try to get out and visit public gardens to see what combinations they have on display. Note how the plant is growing.  Is it in shade, sun, water, very moist conditions. Remember that foliage is truly important as no perennials or shrub blooms all year. Plan your garden with a succession of bloom by selecting plants that bloom at different times of the season and then sit back and enjoy the show!

Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas can add drama to the garden whether pink, white, green or red.  They make great cut flowers!  Early spring is a perfect time to plant Hydrangeas because the ground is still cool so they are less likely to get stressed.

Hydrangeas are basically low maintenance shrubs and highlight the summer and fall gardens. Just prune occasionally for shape and they will serve you well. The key with Hydrangeas is to site them properly to start with so they have the appropriate room to grow and don’t need pruning. You should however remove spent flowers and dead wood. They prefer sun and some shade.  If you do need to prune it should be done after the years’ bloom cycle has ended to ensure blossoms for next year for some that is late summer or even late winter.

I’ll try to explain some of the many varieties of Hydrangeas:

Hydrangea Paniculata – Blooms on new wood and has large coned shaped flowers and are very cold hardy.

Hydrangeas
Hydrangeas

Quick Fire’ – turns a lovely rosey-pink in fall and blooms up to a month earlier than other Hydrangeas; Bobo’ – compact with lime green and violet blooms; Pinky Winky’ –  has large white panicles that turn turns pink at the base during the fall creating a two-toned effect; Pink Diamond’ – white blooms fade to pink and Limelight’ – huge, bright lime green panicles that changes to deep pink, red and burgundy in fall.

Fall blog-13
Pink Diamond
Fall blog-11
Hydrangea ‘Pink Diamond’
Hydrangea Pink Diamond
Hydrangea ‘Pink Diamond’ on left
Quick Fire
Hydrangea ‘Quick Fire’

Hydrangea Quercifolia – Oakleaf Hydrangeas – These have a lovely, peeling bark on older stems and a felt like bark on newer stems. They start out white and turn pink as the season progresses and have amazing burgundy red leaves in fall. Shown below is ‘Alice’ which I use in my garden in a group of 3.  Give it lots of room to spread out! The inflorescences are about 10-14″ long. Others to consider: ‘Snowflake’; ‘Ruby Slippers’ and ‘Gatsby Moon’

Oakleaf Hydrangea
Oakleaf Hydrangea in fall

Hydrangea macrophylla- “Bigleaf Hydrangeas” – these have large round mophead flowers particularly in June, July and August. They have beautiful dark green leaves and can provide some but not great fall color. Also in this category are the Lacecaps.

Hydrangeas
Hydrangea ‘Bloomstruck ‘Endless Summer’

Flower color can be determined often by the acidity (blue-purple) or alkalinity (pink or red) of your soil. Some of these bloom on new growth as well as last year’s stems. So prune right after flowering to be safe if in doubt which you have. Deadheading spent blossoms unless you are going to dry them will help produce more blossoms.

Endless Summer – Bloomstruck’; ‘Nikko Blue’; ‘ColorFantasy’; and ‘Vanilla Strawberry’

Hydrangea arborescens or ‘Smooth Hydrangeas’ – which bloom May – June on new wood so they are good for colder climates although there is little fall leaf color. Most notably ‘Annabelle’ is one of the most hardy with large inflorescenses. Also ‘Incrediball’ is another variety

Annabelle
‘Annabelle’  (Source: Missouri Botanical)

Yet another popular Hydrangea anomala petiolaris: the Climbing Hydrangea: This Hydrangea has lovely white lacecap blossoms and a thick vine that also produces horizontal branches and nice thick green leaves and clings to any structure. The bark is also distinctive with its cinnamon colored bark that exfoliates and is lovely in winter.

Climbing Hydrangea
Climbing Hydrangea (Source: Missouri Botanical)

 

A good source for Hydrangeas is White Flower Farm since they also ship if you are not in the CT area. www.whiteflowerfarm.com

Spring Arrangements & Flowering Plants

After a long winter I love to bring color back into my home as soon as possible. The houseplants have done their duty and brightened the gray days as best they can but now we all want some color!

Tulips en masse-1

When planning your garden or rejuvenating it remember to plan for a variety of sizes, colors, sounds, shapes and textures to provide movement for the eye and a wide variety for bouquets and of course, to support pollinators.

Here are some early spring stars for bouquets that can be used to create the base or backbone of your floral arrangements:

Purple tulip
Tulips

Trees and shrubs – use the branches and flowers: Magnolia, Lilacs, Viburnum, Quince, Andromeda, Forsythia, Fothergilla, Ninebarks ( Physocarpus), Serviceberry (Amelanchier), Spirea, Deutzia, Azalea and Rhododendrons, Redbuds, Mock Orange, Red or Yellow Twig Dogwoods, Corylopsis (Winterhazel), Crabapples, Cherry and Apricot trees.

Magnolia NYBG
Magnolia x soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’ saucer magnolia
flowering-cherry
Flowering Cherry
Lilacs Robert Courturier
A Lilac allee’

Roses-1

 

 

Forsythia
Forsythia on the Hudson River at NYBG

Spring flowers that are ideal for arrangements: Peonies, Hyacinths, Tulips, Daffodils, Lilacs, Alliums, Muscari, Pasque Flowers, Frittilaria, Roses, and Ranunculus to name a few!

Muscari
Muscari
Allium
Alliums
Daffodil field- Laurel Ridge
Daffodils as far as the eye can see!
Pasque flower
Pasque flower

Here are my top picks for more spring flowering perennials and bulbs.

Hellebores, Siberian Iris, Primrose, Feverfew, Alliums, Wisteria, Amsonia, Baptisa, Bleeding Hearts, Lady’s Mantle, Epimedium, Roses, Hypericum, Solomon’s Seal, Hosta leaves and Lobelias

garden-conservancy-020
Bleeding Hearts – Dicentra spectabilis
Wickham Park
Siberian Iris

Also, don’t forget veggies when making arrangements.  Think about baby carrots, artichokes and curly kale and parsley.

Maywood-2

I love to pair Siberian Iris, Nepeta, Sage, Allium Globemaster or Gladiator, Amsonia and Baptisa and I mix them with Daylilies, Heuchera and Grasses for all season bloom after the spring flush is done.

Yard
My spring garden

If you want to have flowers for cutting be sure to plant in large drifts not one here and one there. Planning for the next season now will yield you beautiful arrangements all year!

Are you interested in how I created my garden from scratch in just a few months? Here is a link to: Anatomy of a New Garden

Amaryllis revived! Amaryllis blooming!

 

amaryllis-just-peaking-thru-finally-2

amaryllis-just-peaking-thru-finally

If you are like me and love these beautiful plants you will want to save them till next year. After blooming the bulb needs to rebuild itself. Cut off the flower stalks about 3-5″ above the bulb. Do not cut off the foliage. Keep the plant in a sunny location and water when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. After all frost had passed I moved mine into the garden and sunk the entire pot into the ground for the summer. In the fall after the frost blackened the leaves I cut them off and brought the plants into the cool basement in the dark for about 8-10 weeks. I then repotted them with new soil and gave it a bit of warm water and put them on the window sill hoping they had survived. YEAH! Finally after many weeks they are just peaking thru. Now you start watering when dry. I have them on my west facing kitchen window sill. I will keep you updated with pictures as they develop. Fingers crossed they will be just as beautiful as last year!

Amaryllis are certainly worth waiting for.  With a little care these beauties will brighten your entire winter!

Tip for next season: Order in the fall for blooms by Ground Hog Day.  Amaryllis make great gifts.  Enjoy!

Outstanding Fall Color from Shrubs

Fall in New England can be a magical time with the explosion of color everywhere, the crisp fall air and the anticipation of winter.  It is important to consider all the seasons when planning your garden or adding to it.  If something is not working, be brutal and pull it out and replace it with something that provides color in a different season.  Here are some of my fall favorites considering that I live in Zone 5.

Fall blog-4
Winterberry ‘Red Sprite’
Fall blog-3
Viburnum  ‘Mariesii’
Fall blog-14
Kousa Dogwood
Fall blog-22
Barberry ‘Royal Burgundy’
Hydrangea ‘Quick Fire’ leaves turn glorious colors in fall
Hydrangea ‘Pinky Winky’
Allium tuberosum

 

Fall blog-13
Pink Diamond
Fall blog-12
Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Oakleaf Hydrangea ‘Alice’ which turn a deep red in fall
Fall blog-10
Viburnum ‘Brandywine’
Fall blog-7
River Birch
Fall blog-9
Cotinus ‘Royal Purple’
Fall blog-8
Physocarpus – Ninebark – ‘Summerwine’ and ‘Coppertina’
Fall blog-5
Amsonia ‘Montana’
Fall blog-15
Hamamelis x intermedia
Fall blog-17
Acer palmatum – Japanese Maple ‘Koto no ito’

Of course, don’t forget about perennials- seed heads from Alliums, Sedum, Seed pods from Siberian Iris and Mums

Tell me your favorite fall perennials and shrubs! I also love Red Twig Dogwoods and Fothergilla gardenii for great fall color.

Did you miss the last blog on Fall Grasses or Handy Tips for Autumn clean up

Grasses- The Backbone of the Fall & Winter garden

There are grasses to suit every need and every garden no matter what climate you live in.  Slowly over the summer they grow and slowly by fall they capture you with the amazing structure they bring to the garden. They explode as the season progresses providing a perfect backdrop for late summer and fall blossoms like Dahlias and Black-eyed Susan’s. I now have so many different grasses in my garden and they serve as the backbone of each of my different beds. The foliage and seed heads can be variegated, gold, blue, red, dark-leaved, moisture loving, shade loving, sun loving, tall, short or just spectacular for fall color. They make great companions to other perennials like roses. They can be planted in planters, used just as accent plants, used to line or create pathways, to edge a border or even in water gardens.

untitled-1
When the light shines thru the seed heads they are electric; lighting up the entire garden no matter the weather. Grasses capture light like no other plants I know. When backlit they almost glow from within and this is the ideal way to showcase them.

Grasses-1

Mine are mixed with Russian Sage, Salvias, Dahlias, Phlox, Black-eyed Susan’s, Daisies and Daylilies. I use them to create backdrops for my flower beds where hardscape is not possible. Certainly if you have a wall or other structures grasses can soften those features.

Grasses-1-2

The texture of different grasses provides a plethora of finely textured shapes all within the category of grasses.  You could just have grasses and no two would look the same. I love that grasses are such low maintenance plants.  Frankly, other garden plants take plenty of my time so these hard working plants can just take care of themselves.

Here are some of my grasses. Frankly, I’m losing track as my grasses as tags get lost.  When choosing grasses for your garden remember to check the water and light requirements, pest issues like deer and rabbit resistance before selecting.

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Little Zebra’ – ornamental grass Zone 5-9 Hgt 3-4’ (6-8’ tall when flowering) Wine-purple fading to tan; winter interest; Full sun to part shade

Little zebra-1

Miscanthus sinesis “Gracillimus’ – ornamental grass- Zone 5-9 Hgt 4-7’. (8’ tall when flowering) Copper maturing to Silver; Great winter interest; Full sun to part shade

Grasses add in-3

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’ – Maiden Grass – Zone 5-9 Hgt 4-6’ (Flower stalks 6’ tall) Narrow green leaves with white Variegation on margins; Silvery appearance; Full sun to part shade but best in Full sun (far back left next to Norway Spruce)

Morning Light and Moudry-1

Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’ – Feather Reed grass – Zone 5-9 Hgt 3′ (5′ tall when flowering) Purplish-Green flowers turn golden as seeds mature; Winter interest

Grasses-4

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yakushima’- and ‘Yakushima Dwarf’ – Maiden Grass Zone 5-9 Hgt 3-4’  (Can reach up to 8’ tall) Very showy; Full Sun

Grasses add in-2

Grasses Yakushima-1

Panicum virgatum ‘Northwind’ – Switch Grass Zone 5-9 Hgt 4-5’ (6’ tall when flowering) Olive green to bluish-green foliage with yellow flower panicles; Winter Interest; Full sun to part shade.  Full Sun is best

img_9492

Panicum virgatum ‘Rotstrahlbusch’ – Switch Grass Zone 5-9 Hgt 3’ (5’ tall when flowering) Silver-green leaves turning burgundy red; Winter interest; Full sun to part shade, Full sun is best

Grasses add in-1

Morning Light-1

Panicum virgatum ‘Ruby Ribbons’ – Switch Grass Zone 4-9 Hgt 2-3’ (4’ tall when flowering) ; Blue-green foliage that matures to purple-red. Performs best in Full Sun

Grasses-12

Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’ – Switch Grass Zone 5-9 Hgt 3-4’ Burgundy-Red foliage with reddish pink flower panicles; Full sun to part shade

Grasses-10
This year!
Shenandoah-1
Just planted last year

Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Moudry’ – Black Flowering Fountain Grass Zone 5-9 Hgt 2- 2.5’ (3’ tall when flowering) Best in full sun but can take part shade; Dark purple flower spikes (cover photo)

Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Red Head’ – Red Fountain Grass Zone 5 -9 Hgt 2.5-5’; Winter interest; Burgundy-Red plumes; Full sun

Grasses-11
Softening hardscape (rock and fountain)

Pennisetum oritentale ‘Karley Rose’ – Oriental Fountain Grass Zone 5-8 Hgt 18″  (3’ tall + when flowering) Winter interest; Showy, fluffy, pinkish-white flower spikes; Full Sun

Karley Rose-1

Schizachyrium scoparium ‘Standing Ovation’ – Little Blue Stem Zone 5-9 Hgt 3-4′ Brilliant fiery colored foliage though the fall

img_9495

Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’ and ‘All Gold’ – Japanese Forest Grass Zone 5-9 Hgt 1 – 1.5’ Woodland Grass – Part Shade- Aureola is a golden striped form; All Gold has bright golden yellow leaves.

Grasses-9

Chasmanthium latifolium – Northern Sea Oats Zone 3-8 Hgt 2 – 5’ Self seeds if not cut; Good in an area that you can naturalize- another words- let it do its thing. Full sun to part shade; Seed heads emerge green but turn purplish bronze. Bright green leaves.

Grasses-13

Carex morrowii ‘Evergold’ – Sedge Part Shade Hgt 12-14″ (in front of bird bath)

carex-1

I also use annual grasses for color contrast and backdrop in my annual bed.

Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’ – Fountain Grass -Zone 9-10 Hgt 3-5′ Full Sun

img_9497

Now for the topic of cutting down grasses in fall.  This is really a question of taste.  Can you see your garden from the house? In winter, let’s face it – if we can’t see these plants or structures in the garden from inside you will not have much enjoyment from them.  In that case cut them down.  I typically leave mine up but tie them around so they don’t flop at the first sign of snowfall. This way I can watch them sway in the breeze, or more accurately WIND at my house! Be sure in either case that they get cut down in early spring before the new growth starts. Having said that some grasses do self seed and those you will want to deadhead or just cut down. I forgot to do that last year with my Sea Oats and I paid dearly for it all this year pulling out those unwanted seedlings.

20161217-DSC01094

If your grasses are starting to have large areas that are not blooming it is probably time to divide them.  There are many great books out there on grasses. I really like “Grasses” by Nancy Ondra.

One of the best resources for plant information is Missouri Botanical Garden Plant Finder.  I use this to check zone compatibility, water and sun requirements, deer and rabbit resistance and soil preference. Another resource for information on Coleus: Plant Care Today

As you drive around notice how grasses are being used in your area!

Naumkeag, a National Historic Landmark

Naumkeag was the summer retreat for NYC lawyer and diplomat Joseph Hodges Choate and his family. This property is a National Historic Landmark for its designed landscape created by Architect Fletcher Steele. The famous Blue Steps have been photographed thousands of times I’m sure but the property in any season is magnificent.

Naumkeag blog-12

The mansion was designed in 1885 by Stanford White and became the property of The Trustees in 1959 allowing visitors a glimpse into the past. In 1929, Mabel Choate inherited the property and oversaw a redesign of the gardens. The house has outstanding views of the Berkshires to the west and also towards Monument Mountain.

Naumkeag blog-3
Top Lawn and Tree Peony Terrace

A greenhouse, dairy, and farm produced all of the food for Naumkeag.

The Rose Garden could be seen from the bedroom windows and really needs to be seen from above.  The serpentine paths of gravel wind through beds of floribunda roses.  The railings are painted purple. I love that!!

Rose-1

Naumkeag blog-8

The Linden Walk is all dressed up now for Halloween.  It leads into the spruce forest.  There is a statue of Diana at the focal point.

Naumkeag blog-1-2

Naumkeag blog-7

Naumkeag blog-6

The Blue Steps are a set of concrete steps that wind their way down to the lower garden and allowed Miss Choate to make a gradual descent to her cutting gardens. The Art-Deco design is considered one of the most famous landscapes in our country.

Naumkeag blog-4

The Water Runnel links the fountains for the Afternoon Garden with those in the Blue Steps.  What a delightful feature that attracts wildlife and has a lovely sound.

Rill-1

The Afternoon Garden was the first garden designed by architect Fletcher Steele. There are brightly painted Venetian gondola poles that frame the views of the hilss and enclose this outdoor room.

Naumkeag blog-2

The Chinese Garden, a walled garden, can be entered and exited through the Moon Gate.  There is a Chinese style temple, oriental plants and trees including a group of nine ginkgo trees and statues.

Naumkeag blog-11
Moon Gate
Naumkeag blog-10
Chinese style temple

The Pagoda is constructed of cast-iron on a marble base and framed by Japanese red maples.

Naumkeag blog-5

 

The Evergreen Garden has a circular pool and is a lovely spot for reflection and is surrounded by boxwood hedges. This garden is surrounded by an Allee of Arborvitae that has 24 clipped arborvitaes.

Worth a trip especially during the fall! Enjoy!

Guided tours of the house are available from Memorial Day to Columbus Day. The property is located just out of the center of Stockbridge, MA.

Naumkeag blog-1

Trade Secrets 2017 – The Major General Ashley House

This eighteenth century house sits on an incredible piece of property overlooking the Housatonic River. Mature sugar maples, black locusts and an ancient willow make this property one to behold. The property is naturalized with daffodils and ferns beneath these mighty trees as well as other spring bulbs. The lawn slopes down to the bend in the river compelling you to stop and take it all in!

A formal garden of boxwood parterres and brick paths frame the front of the house. Wooden tuteurs in the center are clematis supports with the beds being filled with tulips in spring and Peonies and Russian Sage in summer.  The garden is enclosed with the quintessential wooden picket fence and a spirea hedge with crabapples surrounding the garden giving some relief from the road.

Parterre

Major Ashley-5

Have you ever tried to espalier a tree? Look how beautiful!

Major Ashley-2

Major Ashley-4

If this doesn’t say come relax and enjoy the beauty I don’t know what does!

Major Ashley-3

Major Ashley-7
Housatonic River

Entry into the pool area is through this door a unique element in the privet hedge encouraging you to see what is beyond.

Major Ashley-6

Major Ashley-8

 

Major Ashley-9
The pool house

 

The gardens were filled with blooming bleeding hearts in several varieties and color variations

Major Ashley-10
Bleeding Hearts
Major Ashley-11
A child’s swing just waiting for you to play.

Did you miss the other Trade Secrets Open Gardens? Here is a link to Coltsfoot Garden 

For more information on Trade Secrets and Women’s Support Services see earlier blogs.

See all the Blogs on Garden Conservancy Days, trips to Italy, and stay tuned for my upcoming trip to Tuscany and Venice in the coming weeks.

Trade Secrets 2017 – Coltsfoot Garden

One of the private gardens open this year for Trade Secrets was Coltsfoot Garden in Cornwall, CT.  This is an enchanting cottage garden that along with the colonial home has been in this family for almost 100 years.  Upon arrival you are immediately dawn in by the multi-colored lilac trees surrounding the garden, the crabapple trees and the surrounding landscape.  This is Litchfield county CT at its finest.

Lilacs

The garden while formal in structure is welcoming and plants are encouraged to self sow wherever they can find a spot.

Coltsfoot Garden-6

There is a newly added second vegetable garden placed closer to the house, surrounded by a picket fence, gravel paths and artful colorscaping of vegetables like asparagus, lettuces, peas, beans, tomatoes, peppers and rhubarbs. Plants are staked using branches and twigs in artful and rustic ways.

Coltsfoot Garden-5

There are perennial gardens framing a neighbor’s old barn featuring boxwood, peonies, crabapple trees, dwarf Alberta Spruce, roses, irises, bachelor buttons, spurge,  and daylilies which create a delightfully soft, uncluttered effect.

Coltsfoot Garden-4

Coltsfoot Garden-3

Gravel paths are created in a geometric pattern to facilitate your winding your way throughout with their edges being blurred by lady’s mantle, nepeta (my favorite plant) and others.

Coltsfoot Garden-7

Coltsfoot Garden-8

This is another garden area with an ingenious method of taming climbing vines. This garden features, raspberries, vegetables, peonies for cut flowers.  I suggest if you love to have cut flowers in your home and hate the idea of cutting in your ornamental beds that you plant a separate area for cutting flowers both perennial and annuals for all season flowers.  Don’t forget to use your greens like hostas, astible,  solomon’s seal, grasses and branches etc. to fill in.

Coltsfoot Garden-11

Coltsfoot Garden-12

Coltsfoot Garden-2

Coltsfoot Garden-10

This couple lovingly maintains the property coaxing dahlias, hydrangeas, lilacs and roses to thrive year after year.  The formal yet informal design of the garden allows for times of not too much fuss!

Thank you to the Hubbard’s for opening their garden to us for Trade Secrets Open Garden Tours 2017. Can’t wait for 2018!

I have written many times over the years about the Trade Secrets event which takes place in mid-May each year.  You can read more about this fabulous event in previous blogs.

Trade Secrets

Trade Secrets GardenTours

Trade Secrets Garden Tours part 2

 

 

 

 

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑