Spectacular Fall Blooms – Black- Eyed Susan’s!

In my garden I have planted to encourage butterflies, bees and birds to enjoy and pollinate.  At this time of the year it is important to keep food sources plentiful for these wonderful creatures.  Black-eyed Susan’s start blooming in late July and continue all fall in my garden in Zone 5.

Most common of the Black Eyed Susan’s is Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldstrum’. If happy, I find it seems to reappear in new areas of my garden as if by design.  Remember when your pollinators are busy plants appear where they are most happy.  If you don’t want this you will need to pull them out.  These look best when planted in masses or drifts.  Leave the seed heads and the birds will love you! Hardy to Zone 4.

rudbeckias-1
Rudbeckia ‘Goldstrum’

Rudbeckia hirta like most of the Rudbeckias are herbaceous perennials and is happy in Zone 3 to 7. It blooms from June to September with yellow or orange yellow rays and dark brown centers. The leaves are a little rough and hairy giving a nice contrast in the perennial border. It loves full sun and medium water.  It will naturalize!  That means spread!

rudbeckias-2
Rudbeckia hirta

Rudbeckia fulgida var. ‘Deam’s coneflower’ has large daisy like flower heads in yellow or orange petals (rays) with a dark center. It tolerates either full sun to partial shade. Have clay soil, you’re good to go with this variety and for the most part all in this category.

Deam's-1
Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Deam’s coneflower’

 

Problems with deer? Then Black-eyed Susan’s are for you as deer typically don’t touch them.  BUT!!!! when hungry deer will eat anything! Forewarned!

Indian Summer is drought tolerant but don’t think the bunnies aren’t interested! This summer I have been battling with these determined guys.  Winter hardy to Zones 3-7.  All Black-eyed Susan’s need full sun and well-drained soils. I find that deadheading spent flowers helps prolong bloom time and encourage additional blooms. Given a spot they love they will self-seed. They have daisy like flower heads that appeal to butterflies. The flower heads are huge and add bold, stunning color to borders.

Black-eyed Susan’s are sometimes called Gloriosa Daisy.

rudbeckias-3
Rudbeckia ‘Indian Summer’

Rudbeckia ‘Herbstsonne’ is a tall beauty and one of my favorites and this summer a favorite of my local bunnies!  It can grow up to 7′ tall so I use it in the back of the border and support it. It starts blooming in June and goes all summer. It loves well drained soil in full sun. The large daisy like flowers having drooping petals (rays) with bright green center cones.

rudbeckias-4
Rudbeckia ‘Herbstsonne’

Rudbeckia subtomentosa ‘Henry Eilers’ prefers medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun.  Deadheading here also helps encourage additional blooms. It typically grows 3-5′ tall so I use it in the back of the border to showcase smaller plants. It has stiff, upright leafy stems that hold these blooms straight and tall.  I prefer to support all of my very tall plants with decorative supports. The rays are rolled unlike the typical Black-eyed Susan’s so it has a quilled effect. The flowers bloom in clusters starting in July and lastly all the way thru September.

rudbeckias-5
Rudbeckia ‘Henry Eilers’

What pairs with these late summer gems? Well I love purples so in my garden I have Agastache Blue Boa, Russian Sage, Liatris, Daylilies, Phlox, Nepeta and Dahlias.  In one bed I have paired it with “hot” colors like red and orange daylilies and Dahlias as well as Red Persicaria.

What combinations do you love with Black-Eyed Susan’s?

One thought on “Spectacular Fall Blooms – Black- Eyed Susan’s!

Add yours

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: